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Rhythm

When I was growing up, my grandparents had a series of photos from Eadweard Muybridge's Animal Locomotion series.  I always found them to be fascinating, but it wasn't until I got to college that I realized the significance of this body of work. 

What impressed me the most about his work was not his creativity in composing the images themselves, but rather the creativity that he exercised in his technical implementation for achieving his visual message.  Much like Niepce and Daguerre, a large portion of the creative process wasn't focused on the end result, but the foundation. 

I thought about this for years - how could I produce a modernized version of his ideas?  More specifically, how could I produce something new based upon his goals, but also establish my own creative foundation in the process, an endeavour certainly more true to the form of the original body of work?

This series really has no resemblance to Muybridge's efforts, but to me, it was an exercise in attempting to work from a very abstract concept not founded on traditional rules. 



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